The Organic Directory

Bringing the World Together Organically

What is Organic Coffee and Why You Should Care!

 

What is Organic Coffee ?

Simply put Organic Coffee Grown and Processsed without the use of any Chemicals!

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What is the Best Organic Coffee ?

This is not only the most common question asked, but you need to consider several factors. Where was the coffee grown and what varieties grown. How it is Milled, Dry versus Wet. The you have the Roasting Process, Light, Medium and Full. Each adds different Flavor profiles.

 

Organic Coffee Brands

This Section has been reserved for our Reviews of Organic Coffee that are available online.

Organic Coffee Farms

 

Organic Coffee Farms in Brazil

 

Nossa Senhora De Fatima

 

The Nossa Senhora De Fatima farm is owned by Ricardo de Aguiar Resende and his wife Gisele.

They are both 3rd generation coffee growers.

Located in the Minas Gerais region, one of Brazil’s Best Coffee Growing Regions, where they farm nearly 700 acres.

Since 2004, the farm and coffee have been Certified Organic Certification by BCS (Kiwa BCS Oko Garantie)

Grown at elevations  between  3,600 and 4,500 feet above sea level.

Varieties Grown: Acaia, Bourbon, Catuai, Mundo Nova

Processed using the Natural method and Sun Dried on their patio’s

Harvested between April and July and ready for export by August.

 

Organic Coffee Farms in Columbia

Coming Soon

 

Organic Coffee Farms in Costa Rica

 

Welcome to Las Lajas Micromill

 

Oscar and Francisca Chacon of Las Lajas Micromill are third-generation coffee producers. They are committed to quality and innovation. They are best known for being among the first to produce honey coffees in Costa Rica. The micromill is also one of the only certified-organic mills in the area.

Since 2004, Las Lajas Micromill has been Certified Organic by BCS (Kiwa BCS Oko Garantie).

As average temperatures rise and the weather patterns change. The Chacons are considering adding more shade trees to their farm to moderate the heat. And to add irrigation systems to combat the inconsistent rainy seasons Costa Rica has had the past few years.

To mitigate their water usage, Oscar uses a Penagos demucilaginator to depulp his coffee. Since the coffees are all natural or honey process, very little water is used at the mill.

Harvesting and processing are overseen with great care by both Oscar and Francisca. During the harvest, Francisca will measure the Brix of the cherry to determine the optimal ripeness. Picking will begin when the Brix reads about 22°. Harvesting by Brix reading is also helpful as newer varieties sometimes ripen to different colors. Using the refractometer helps keep the harvest at uniform ripeness, which is key when producing high-quality naturals and honeys.

 

Back to the Future

 

Las Lajas began producing honey coffees in 2008. After an earthquake cut off the mill’s access to water for several weeks. Oscar had heard that in Brazil and Ethiopia they use pulped-natural and natural techniques to process coffees. Café Imports president Andrew Miller was visited the area, and was so impressed by the flavor of the Chacons’ coffee. That they became one of the first buyers of the new process.

Oscar believes that just as the roast profile will change the flavor of a coffee. He believes that the drying  method also has an impact.

He wants the drying to happen slowly, which means that production is necessarily limited.

las lajas micromill

Las Lajas Micromill’s Honey Process

 

The Chacons produce several different types of honeys and naturals. The Honeys, are where 100% of the mucilage is left on the coffee. The coffee is then dried in different ways. Which is determined by the weather on the day the coffee is harvested.

  • Yellow Honey: Coffee is turned hourly on raised beds.
  • Red Honey: Coffee is turned several times a day on the beds, but not as frequently as for yellow honey.
  • Black Honey: The coffee is only turned once per day.

 

The Las Lajas Micromill also do

three natural processes.

 

  • Perla Negra: Dries directly in the sun for 10 days. Then rotating constantly, then transferred to bags and left for 2–3 days before being finished on the raised beds.
  • Alma Negra: Drying starts on the patio, then the coffee is piled overnight and spread out in the sun during the day.
  • Diamonda Negra: This new process is dried completely in piles in the greenhouse.

 

 

Organic Coffee Farm from the

Democratic Republic of the Congo

 

Soprocopiv Cooperative

 

Founded in 2004, the Soprocopiv Cooperative is in the Village of Butembo

They are dedicated towards sourcing the finest coffee beans from farms around the North Kivu region.

They have increased the livelihoods of many farmers in the region.

Since 2013, the farm has been Cerified Organic by IMO (Institute for Marketecology-Switzerland)

Grown at an elevation of 4,500 feet above sea level.

Varieties Grown: Bourbon

Rare to find a single variety coffee.

Processed using the Fully Washed Method and Sun Dried on their patio’s

Harvested Between August through December and ready for export by April.

 

Organic Coffee Farm in Ethiopia

 

Sidamo

The Oromia Coffee Farmer’s Cooperative Union was formed with merger of 35 smaller cooperatives.

Today, representing over 23,000 farmers, growing coffee in Ethiopia’s major coffee growing regions.

Most are in the countries Southwestern Rainforests.

Located in the Sidamo region, one of Ethiopia’s Best Coffee Growing Regions.

Since 2005, the farm has been Certified Organic by BCS (Kiwa BCS Oko Garantie)

Grown at elevations  between  4,500 and 6,000 feet above sea level.

Varieties Grown: Indigenous

Processed using the Natural method and Sun Dried on their patio’s

Harvested between September and December and ready for export by April.

 

Organic Coffee Farms in Guatemala

 

Finca Ceylan & Anexos

Finca Ceylan & Anexos is owned by the Echeverria Family since 1870.

Also, well known for growing and processing exceptional coffee’s

Finally, the Finca not only protects the soil by using Organic techniques but also protects the local habitat.

While, providing local jobs.

Since 2005, the farm has been Certified Organic by OCIA (Organic Crop Improvement Association)

Grown at elevations between 3,300 and 4,000 feet above sea level.

Varieties Grown: Bourbon, Typica and Mundo Novo

Processed using the Washed using Aqua Pulpers and Sun Dried on their patio’s

Harvested between October and March  and ready for export by June.

Organic Coffee Farms in Indonesia

Bali

A Supak Abinas is like a cooperative.

They make the Bali Blue Coffee

After the devastating eruption of the Gunung Agung Volcano in 1963. The Indonesian Government initiated a series of programs to revitalize the coffee industry on Bali.

Today, Bali has 20,000 acres of coffee under cultivation wnith the best growing in the Kintamani Highlands.

Grown at elevations  between  3,900 and 5,500 feet above sea level.

Varieties Grown: Bourbon and Typica

Processed by the Wet Hulled method and Sun Dried on their patio’s.

Harvested between May and July and ready for export by October.

 

Sumatra-Aceh Province

Triple-Picked “Adsenia”

Ketiara Cooperative.

They make the Triple Picked “Adsenia”. Adsenia is another name for a a ancient variety called Tim Tim which they are seeking to preserve..

Also, it is very Rare to find a coffee that is 100% of one variety.

Grown at elevations between 4,000 to 6,000 feet above sea level.

Processed by the Wet Hulled method and Sun Dried on their patio’s.

Harvested between September and May and ready for export in June.

Organic Coffee

 

Organic Coffee Farms in Mexico

“Tzeltal Tzotzil” Cooperative

Located in the Chiapas region of Mexico

Since 2017, the farm has been Certified Organic by CMEX (Certificadora Mexicana de Productos y Processos Ecologicos SC)

Grown at an elevation of 4,500 feet above sea level.

Varieties Grown: Bourbon, Mundo Novo and Typica

Processed using the Fully Washed method and Sun Dried on their patio’s

Harvested between November and April and ready for export by May.

 

Organic Coffee Farms in Nicaragua

 

J & M Family Coffee Farm

The J & M Family Coffee Farm is in the town of Jinotega in the Department of Jinotega.

Founded in the in 1980’s by Juan de Dios Castillo and his wife Miriam Aruaz and today run by there 5 children. .

Today, it’s a family business being run by there five children.

And they buy from five other local farms to produce there Paraiso Coffee.

Grown at elevation between 3,400 feet to 5.000 feet above sea level.

Varieties Grown:  Catura, Catuai, Bourbon, Catimor and Marogogype.

Since xxxx the farm has been Certified Organic by xxxx.

Processed by the Fully Washed method and Sun Dried on their patio’s.

Harvested from December and March and ready for export by July.

 

COMULFAC

Founded in 2013 COMULFAC, also known as Cooperativa Multifuncional Family Coffee

They make the  Alta De Jinotega coffee.

for some larger Family Farms from the Department of Jinoteca.

They own their own Micro-Mill to control the process to ensure the highest quality coffee.

Grown at an elevation of 3.000 to 5.200 feet above sea level.

Varieties Grown: Caturra, Catuai, Bourbon, Catinor and Marogogype.

Processed by the Fully Washed method and Sun Dried on their patio’s.

Harvested between December and March and ready for export by July.

 

PRODECOOP

PRODECOOP, also Known as Central Multiple Services Cooperative.

The cooperative is in the town of Paacaguina, representing 2,300 local coffee farmers in the Department of Madriz. Near the Honduran border.

Since 2000 the farm has been Certified Organic by OCIA (Organic Crop Improvement Association)

Grown at 3,800 feet above sea level.

Varieties Grown: Bourbon and Catura.

Processed by the Fully Washed method and Sun Dried on their patio’s.

Harvested between November and March and ready for export by July.

 

Organic Coffee Farms in Papua New Guinea

 

Coming Soon

 

Organic Coffee Farms in Peru

 

COOPAFSI

 

COOPAFSI, which is also known as Cooperative Agrraria “Frontera San IgIgnacio”

They make the “Las Damas de San Ignacio” coffee.

Founded in 1969, COOPAFSI is in the city of San Ignacio in the Department of Cajamarca. Representing over 2,000 family farms.

Since 2015, the farm and coffee has been Certified Organic by Ceres (Certification of Enviromental Statndards).

Grown at elevations between 3,800 and 5,500 feet above sea level.

Varieties Grown: Typica, Mundonovo, Caturra and Catimor.

Processed by the Fully Washed method and Sun Dried on their patio’s.

Harvested between May and September and ready for export by November.

La Florida Cooperative

 

The La Florida Cooperative was Founded in 1965 by 100 farmers in the Chanchamayo region of Peru.

Today the cooperative has grown to over 2,000 Farmers.

The improved revenue the cooperative receives for its products have help build much needed l infrastructure that benefiting the region.

This includes 5 Roadways, a Water Works, Schools, Clinics and  a Bridge.

The Cooperative established The Occupational Learning Center for Sustainable Agriculture,

Since 2005, the farm has been Certified Organic by IMO (Institute for Marketecology-Switzerland)

Grown at elevations between 3,600 and 4,200 feet above sea level.

Varieties Grown: Bourbon, Catimor, Typica, Caturra and Pache.

Processed using the Fully Washed method and Sun Dried on their patio’s

Harvested between June and August and ready for export by November.

 

Organic Coffee Farms in Timor

Cooperative Café Timor

Located on the Island of Timor, shared with Indonesia. Formally a Portuguese colony until 1974.

Portugal planted coffee in the colony over 400 years ago.

After a coup in Portugal, East Timor was abandoned. In 1975 a Civil War broke out and then in 1976 Indonesia invaded declaring it its 24th province.

A Peace accord was reached in 1999 and on August 30th, 2001 East Timor was Declared an Independent Republic.

Since 2017, the farm has been Certified Organic by CUC (Control Union Certifications)

Grown at elevations between 2,400 and 4,800 feet above sea level.

Varieties Grown: Bourbon and Hibrido de Timor

Processed using the Fully Washed method and Sun Dried on their patio’s

Harvested between April and September and ready for export by August.

 

 

Thank You For Visiting

the Organic Chamber of Commerce

Bringing the World Together Organically

 

 

MatthewRinkerman • December 14, 2017


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